Tag Archives: families first coronavirus response act

Common “Place of Care” and “Child Care Provider” Questions Under Families First Coronavirus Response Act


By: Attorneys Bryan T. Symes and Mindy K. Dale – Weld Riley, S.C.

With respect to the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the “dust is settling,” or people are finally “finding their sea legs”—pick your favorite, appropriate idiomatic expression. Now that the initial “triage” period is over and things have calmed a bit [relatively speaking, we get it], those brave souls who are responsible for administering FFCRA leave within their respective businesses are grappling with some of the finer FFCRA details. In that regard, we continue to receive the same class of questions concerning leave requested under the FFCRA to care for children [see April 15, 2020 Weld Report blog about the breadth of the term “son or daughter” for purposes of the FFCRA, available here: Families First Coronavirus Response Act’s Definition of “Son or Daughter” Extends Emergency Leave Protections to Employees in Nontraditional Family Structures] whose schools or places of care are closed, or child care providers are unavailable, due to COVID-19 related reasons.   We thought we would share two reoccurring questions, and our answers, below.

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Families First Coronavirus Response Act’s Definition of “Son or Daughter” Extends Emergency Leave Protections to Employees in Nontraditional Family Structures

By: Attorney Bryan T. Symes – Weld Riley, S.C.

As a child of the 80s, I learned a very valuable life lesson from…The Transformers cartoon—namely, sometimes there is “more than meets the eye.”   The same can be said of the definition of “son or daughter” baked into the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, as explained below. 

Continue reading Families First Coronavirus Response Act’s Definition of “Son or Daughter” Extends Emergency Leave Protections to Employees in Nontraditional Family Structures