Tag Archives: covid-19

Best-Laid Contractual Plans and COVID-19: Force Majeure Clauses May Offer Relief

By: Attorney David A. Richie – Weld Riley,  S.C.

As the famed poet Robert Burns once wrote, the best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.[1]

This is especially true in our current climate, as the COVID-19 pandemic has upended entities’ abilities to carry out their plans and obligations that are spelled out in contracts.  For example, COVID-19 has caused shutdowns of entire cities and states across the U.S. and the world, several of which have not yet, or only partially, re-opened.  In turn, these shutdowns have caused business interruptions and disrupted supply chains.  In some instances, all of this has combined to make performance of contractual obligations impossible. Continue reading Best-Laid Contractual Plans and COVID-19: Force Majeure Clauses May Offer Relief

Additional Protections Afforded Residential Tenants During COVID-19 Pandemic

By: Attorney Daneille M. Strong – Weld Riley,  S.C.
The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) has added to the protections provided to tenants during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Effective immediately, landlords are prohibited from assessing or collecting late fees due to late or non-payment of rent. Continue reading Additional Protections Afforded Residential Tenants During COVID-19 Pandemic

“Heard” Immunity: The Value of Updating Workplace Testing Policies in Advance of the COVID-19 Reboot

By: Attorney Bryan T. Symes – Weld Riley, S.C.

By now, most people have developed at least a surface-level understanding of the herd immunity, or herd protection, epidemiological concept.   Herd immunity describes a scenario in which enough people within a community are immune to COVID-19, such that the remaining individuals who are not immune are sufficiently protected from infection—i.e., the risk of infection becomes politically palatable.   The concept of herd immunity is not without controversy—and this post is not an endorsement of herd immunity.    No, instead, this post is about something altogether different—heard immunity.  Intrigued?  If so, keep reading.

Continue reading “Heard” Immunity: The Value of Updating Workplace Testing Policies in Advance of the COVID-19 Reboot

Common “Place of Care” and “Child Care Provider” Questions Under Families First Coronavirus Response Act


By: Attorneys Bryan T. Symes and Mindy K. Dale – Weld Riley, S.C.

With respect to the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the “dust is settling,” or people are finally “finding their sea legs”—pick your favorite, appropriate idiomatic expression. Now that the initial “triage” period is over and things have calmed a bit [relatively speaking, we get it], those brave souls who are responsible for administering FFCRA leave within their respective businesses are grappling with some of the finer FFCRA details. In that regard, we continue to receive the same class of questions concerning leave requested under the FFCRA to care for children [see April 15, 2020 Weld Report blog about the breadth of the term “son or daughter” for purposes of the FFCRA, available here: Families First Coronavirus Response Act’s Definition of “Son or Daughter” Extends Emergency Leave Protections to Employees in Nontraditional Family Structures] whose schools or places of care are closed, or child care providers are unavailable, due to COVID-19 related reasons.   We thought we would share two reoccurring questions, and our answers, below.

Continue reading Common “Place of Care” and “Child Care Provider” Questions Under Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Safer-at-Home Order: Remix Edition

By: Attorney Samuel D. Bach-Hanson – Weld Riley, S.C.
On April 16, 2020, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (“DHS”), at the direction of Governor Tony Evers, issued a new Safer at Home Order, Emergency Order #28 (the “New Order”). This Order goes into effect on April 24, when Emergency Order #12 (the “Original Order”) expires, and will be effective through Tuesday, May 26, 2020.

Continue reading Safer-at-Home Order: Remix Edition

Families First Coronavirus Response Act’s Definition of “Son or Daughter” Extends Emergency Leave Protections to Employees in Nontraditional Family Structures

By: Attorney Bryan T. Symes – Weld Riley, S.C.

As a child of the 80s, I learned a very valuable life lesson from…The Transformers cartoon—namely, sometimes there is “more than meets the eye.”   The same can be said of the definition of “son or daughter” baked into the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, as explained below. 

Continue reading Families First Coronavirus Response Act’s Definition of “Son or Daughter” Extends Emergency Leave Protections to Employees in Nontraditional Family Structures

Emergency Guidance on Prohibited Debt Collection Practices

On April 13, 2020, the Wisconsin Department of Financial Institutions (DFI), at the direction of Governor Tony Evers, issued “Emergency Guidance on Prohibited Debt Collection Practices”. The Guide reminds debt collectors of the prohibitions on debt collection under the Wisconsin Consumer Act. And it goes further to warn that what were considered permissible debt collection practices may not be permissible during the State’s lockdown.

Continue reading Emergency Guidance on Prohibited Debt Collection Practices

Emergency Coronavirus Relief Package

In response to the COVID-19 global pandemic, President Trump on Wednesday signed into law an emergency relief package (https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/6201/text), which, among other things, provides paid leave to many American workers if they need to take time off work due to the coronavirus. The legislation becomes effective no later than 15 days after its enactment.

Continue reading Emergency Coronavirus Relief Package